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Home > Plant Spacing - Recommended distances between plants

Plant Spacing - Recommended distances between plants

One of the questions that we are asked frequently by our customers is plant spacing. How far apart do I plant my trees or shrubs?

In reply to those questions, the following is useful information.

Plant Spacing

Spacing guidelines for various types of tree plantations are listed as follows (43,560 square feet/acre):

Christmas Trees 6 x 6 foot spacing, 1210 trees/acre 8 x 8 foot spacing, 680 trees/acre 5 x 6 foot spacing, 1450 trees/acre

Reforestation 8 x 8 foot spacing, 680 trees/acre

Windbreaks 8 x 10 foot spacing in staggered rows, 545 trees/acre 10 x 10 foot spacing in staggered rows, 436 trees/acre 6 x 6 foot spacing in staggered rows for shrubs, 1210 trees/acre

In planning windbreaks, the first item to consider is location. Place the planting on the windward side of areas needing protection with inside rows no closer than 50 feet from area to be protected. Snow, when accompanied by wind, will pile up in driveways and around buildings if the planting is too close. Avoid planting tall-growing trees under utility lines. Where driveways and main roads join, avoid creating hazardous blind corners by planting no closer than 20 feet to the main road. Curve the windbreak when possible for ease of cultivation and a pleasing appearance.

Plan the number and length of rows so proper numbers of trees and shrubs can be ordered. Determine species needed and spacing between each plant and spacing between rows. Row spacing should be 12-20 feet. Distance between plants in the shrub row should be 3-5 feet for deciduous species; if juniper is used for a shrub row, space plants 5-7 feet apart. For interior rows, space evergreens 8-12 feet apart and deciduous trees 10-14 feet apart.

Place the shrub row on the windward side of windbreaks. Next, come two or more rows of deciduous trees and then evergreen trees. Where space is limited, it is better to have two or three rows of evergreens rather than deciduous trees because evergreens form a far more efficient wind, dust, and snow barrier. However, most evergreen species are slower growing than deciduous species.

The above information was taken from the Conservation Tree Seedlings Planting and Care Guide for Arizona Landowners published by the Arizona State Land Department Forestry Division.

In landscape plantings for hedges, shrubs are generally spaced 3-5 feet apart. To create a tree hedge (maybe to mark a property line), space trees 8-10 feet apart for deciduous trees and about 10 feet apart for evergreen trees.

Grapes - plant 3 feet apart in rows that are 8-10 feet apart.

Groundcovers - plant 12" apart for border and mass plantings.

Strawberries - plant 2' apart in raised rows in full sun.

Plant Spacing - Recommended distances between plants

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